• David Braley Centre for Antibiotic Discovery gives researchers a fighting chance against antimicrobial resistance

    June 24, 2019
    • News Article
    A forward-looking McMaster donor is investing $7 million in a new research centre dedicated specifically to tackling the growing global threat of antimicrobial resistance. David Braley, whose gifts to the university include a $50-million investment in McMaster teaching, learning and health-care research and delivery, has allocated $7 million from that 2007 gift towards the new David Braley Centre for Antibiotic Discovery.
  • Doors of new institute open at McMaster University

    June 21, 2019
    • News Article
    The offices of an institute dedicated to broadening Canada's research capacity in infectious disease and the response of the human immune system, opened today at McMaster University. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Institute of Infection and Immunity (CIHR III) is McMaster's first institute sponsored by the federal health research funding agency.
  • Hanna named associate dean, graduate studies for health sciences

    June 20, 2019
    • Appointments / Promotions
    The new vice-dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences and associate dean of graduate studies (health sciences) is Steven Hanna. Hanna is a professor in the Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact of the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine.
  • Bringing together disaster relief and primary care

    June 14, 2019
    • News Article
    Lynda Redwood-Campbell is a professor with the Department of Family Medicine as well as an active member of the Canadian Red Cross International Emergency Response Unit (ERU) team.
  • Large international study finds diabetes drug cuts cardiovascular and kidney problems

    June 10, 2019
    • News Article
    A clinical trial that followed more than 9,900 people in 24 countries has found that the drug dulaglutide reduced cardiovascular events and kidney problems in middle-aged and older people with Type 2 diabetes.
  • International team tracks future for children with cerebral palsy

    June 7, 2019
    • News Article
    The first question of parents of a child with cerebral palsy is about their child's future physical capabilities. To date, health professionals have had little information to share. Now an international team of researchers, including those at McMaster University, has established a trend line for people with cerebral palsy from age one to 21, describing the developmental paths for their mobility and looking after themselves in day-to-day tasks like dressing.
  • New research centre brings expertise in healthy aging

    June 7, 2019
    • News Article
    Older adults range in age from 65 to 105 and represent widely varying health and social needs, yet this growing cohort is often grouped in one category. Two established research platforms of McMaster University aim to address the diverse needs of Ontario's older adults by supporting and advancing patient and caregiver-partnered research in aging.
  • Chronic pain of veterans addressed with new research centre

    July 29, 2019
    • News Article
    More than four in 10 Canadian veterans face chronic pain, double the proportion of other adults in the country. Now, a new research centre has been established at McMaster University to specifically address the issue. The Centre of Excellence on Chronic Pain will focus on research on chronic pain of veterans, setting standards of care and ensuring that information is shared across the country.
  • Most deaths related to non-cardiac surgery occur after surgery

    July 29, 2019
    • News Article
    It's the recovery period, not the operating room that is risky for patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, according to a large international study led by McMaster University. Based on patients at 28 health centres in 13 countries, the results show less than one per cent of deaths of these patients occurred in the operating room, but 29 per cent of deaths occurred after discharge from hospital.
  • Younger Canadians more likely to try recreational cannabis

    July 26, 2019
    • News Article
    Nearly 1 in 5 Canadians may try cannabis or increase consumption of the drug after legalization for recreational use, according to research from McMaster University. Those more likely to do so are younger in age, have used cannabis in the past three months, have a higher income, and self-report their mental health as poor or fair.
  • Recent cannabis use may slow memory

    July 19, 2019
    • News Article
    Recent cannabis users may be more likely to experience memory problems or difficulties with cognitive function than those who don’t use the drug, says a study led by McMaster University researcher James MacKillop. The professor of psychiatry holds the Peter Boris Chair in Addictions Research and he is director of the Michael G. DeGroote Centre for Medicinal Cannabis Research.
  • Berg named Boris Family Chair in translational blood stem cell research

    July 11, 2019
    • Appointments / Promotions
    Tobias Berg has been appointed the inaugural Boris Family Chair in Leukemia and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Translational Research for the Faculty of Health Sciences at McMaster University.
  • Partnership created to uncover reasons for frailty in aging populations

    July 11, 2019
    • News Article
    Three national research groups and a leading biotechnology company are teaming together to discover the frailty biomarkers that may shed light on why some people become frail, how to determine the severity of frailty and what can be done to help avoid the condition.
  • McMaster clinical medicine ranked 29th in the world

    July 11, 2019
    • News Article
    The 2019 Global Ranking of Academic Subjects has ranked McMaster’s clinical medicine and civil engineering programs 29th in the world. The clinical medicine is ranked second in Canada, and the civil engineering program is third in the country.
  • Thabane named acting chair of HEI

    July 2, 2019
    • Appointments / Promotions
    Lehana Thabane has been appointed the acting chair of the Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact (HEI) of the Faculty of Health Sciences.
  • Visiting Japanese faculty and students share best practices in health sciences education

    August 30, 2019
    • News Article
    Delegations from two Japanese universities visited McMaster recently for an experiential learning exchange, designed to share knowledge, ideas, cultural approaches and best practices in health sciences education. “The success of the UN’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals depends on collaboration and partnerships with other universities and networks,” explains Andrea Baumann, McMaster’s associate vice-president, global health.

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  • Study finds many psychiatric disorders have heightened impulsivity

    August 28, 2019
    • News Article
    Individuals with many different psychiatric disorders have a higher tendency to choose smaller, immediate rewards over larger, delayed rewards, a study led by Hamilton researchers has found. The findings of a meta-analysis by researchers of McMaster University and St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, which combined data from more than 40 studies, was published in JAMA Psychiatry today.
  • Clare Mitchell returns to the Faculty as COO

    August 22, 2019
    • Appointments / Promotions
    Clare Mitchell is returning to the Faculty of Health Sciences as its chief operating officer, effective Sept. 9, 2019. She had been the director of administration for the Faculty’s Department of Surgery from 1999 through 2012 when she left to be director of administration for the Department of Medicine of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto. While there, she received a leadership award from the Faculty for staff impact.
  • Canadian researchers find 'silent' strokes common after surgery, linked to cognitive decline

    August 15, 2019
    • News Article
    Canadian researchers have discovered that covert – or 'silent' - strokes are common in seniors after they have elective, non-cardiac surgery and double their risk of cognitive decline one year later.
  • McMaster researchers reveal the ancient natural history of antibiotic production and resistance

    August 14, 2019 by Christy Groves
    • News Article
    A study from McMaster University has unearthed new details about the evolutionary history of both antibiotic production and resistance and dates their co-emergence as far back as 350 to 500 million years.
  • Home births as safe as hospital births: international study

    August 8, 2019
    • News Article
    A large international study led by McMaster University shows that low risk pregnant women who intend to give birth at home have no increased chance of the baby’s perinatal or neonatal death compared to other low risk women who intend to give birth in a hospital. The results have been published by The Lancet’s EClinicalMedicine journal.
  • Study offers insights into making surgery safer for patients taking direct oral anticoagulants

    August 6, 2019
    • News Article
    A Hamilton-led international study of more than 3,000 patients could set the stage globally for how patients can safely use blood-thinning medications before and after surgery to mitigate risk of bleeding and stroke. The Perioperative Anticoagulation Use for Surgery Evaluation (PAUSE) study was conducted across 23 clinical centres in Canada, United States and Europe.
  • Hospital and McMaster family medicine work to prioritize patient's wishes in long-term care

    August 6, 2019
    • News Article
    Every day in Ontario, long-term care residents are at risk of receiving unwanted and non-beneficial treatment because of errors related to consent. Now McMaster University's Department of Family Medicine and the William Osler Health System (WOHS) are teaming together on a project to reduce the number of long-term care patients in Ontario who, because of these errors, are transferred back and forth to hospital multiple times before they die.
  • Study finds simple cardiac risk score can predict early problems with blood flow in the brain

    September 30, 2019
    • News Article
    A simple cardiac risk score can indicate who may have carotid artery plaque and silent strokes which often come before a serious clinical stroke. The findings come from one of the largest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cohort studies in North America, a study designed to understand the risk factors associated with cerebrovascular disease before the person is aware of it.
  • Gordon Guyatt to be inducted to Hamilton Gallery of Distinction

    September 30, 2019
    • News Article
    Gordon Guyatt, Distinguished University Professor in the Faculty of Health Sciences at McMaster University, is one of six outstanding citizens to be named to the Hamilton Gallery of Distinction this year. The 2019 inductees include leaders in medicine, education, theatre, environmentalism, community improvement, mentorship and civic engagement. Each has made a lasting contribution to Hamilton.
  • International study finds similar results from total or partial hip replacement

    September 26, 2019
    • News Article
    To do a total or partial hip replacement for older adults who have a hip fracture has been the question. Now a large clinical study of almost 1,500 patients in 10 countries world-wide has found those who had a total hip arthroplasty have modestly better function after two years, but a higher incidence of serious complications. The study authors suggest the advantages of total hip replacement may not be compelling.
  • FHS IT needs assessment update

    September 20, 2019
    • News Article
    A information technology (IT) needs assessment for the Faculty of Health Sciences (FHS) has gotten underway with Kathy Denney as project manager. This assessment is to understand the IT needs within the Faculty, identify how those needs are currently being met by the existing IT organization and service delivery model.
  • Physician assistant students begin a tradition

    September 16, 2019
    • News Article
    Kira Slivitzky was a molecular biologist and researcher who found she always enjoyed talking to people rather than mice. Raymond Khanano, with a master's in public health, sought a clinical career with flexibility. Nicole Veloce, with a life sciences degree, was attracted to being part of the health care team.
  • McMaster researchers find new way to find antibiotics in dirt

    September 11, 2019
    • News Article
    Researchers at McMaster University have designed a new way to rapidly identify antibiotics hidden in common dirt. Their method, published today in Nature Biotechnology, may help guide drug discovery by allowing researchers to reassess the potential of bacteria that have already been mined for rare or new compounds with antibiotic activity. The goal is to develop the medicines in response to the current global antimicrobial resistance crisis.
  • Hemophilia three times more prevalent than thought

    September 10, 2019
    • News Article
    More than 1,125,000 men around the world have the inherited bleeding disorder of hemophilia, and 418,000 of those have a severe version of the mostly undiagnosed disease, says a new study led by McMaster University researchers. This is three times what was previously known. Only 400,000 people globally were estimated to have the disorder which is caused by a defect in the F8 or F9 gene which encodes instructions for making the factor proteins that helps blood clot. For those with hemophilia, lack of treatment leads to chronic and disabling joint disease, while bleeding into organs and brain hemorrhages can lead to disability and death.
  • Cardiovascular disease leading cause of death world-wide, but cancer rising cause in rich countries: Study

    September 3, 2019
    • News Article
    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of death among middle-aged adults around the world; however, in high-income countries deaths from cancer have become twice as frequent as those from CVD. The findings come from the first large prospective international study documenting the frequency of common diseases and death rates in high-, middle- and low-income countries using a standardized approach.
  • Study finds most risks for heart attacks, strokes, deaths around world could be improved

    September 3, 2019
    • News Article
    More than 70 per cent of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and deaths around the world may be attributed to a small number of common but modifiable risk factors. The findings are the result of large international study, involving more than 155,000 people in 21 countries, led by researchers of the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences.
  • It takes a community to lower cardiovascular risk

    September 3, 2019
    • News Article
    Concerted effort by friends, family and non-physician health workers can make a dramatic difference in reducing the risk factors for heart problems in patients with hypertension, an international study by Hamilton researchers has found. People with new or poorly controlled hypertension given an integrated and comprehensive intervention by non-physician health workers along with personal supporters over a year had a reduction in cardiovascular risk of more than 40 per cent compared to usual care.
  • Preventative artery repair provides major benefit after serious heart attack

    September 3, 2019
    • News Article
    A major international study has shown that opening all clogged arteries with stents after a serious heart attack is much better than opening only the single clogged artery that caused the heart attack. About half of all heart attack victims are found to have additional clogged arteries in addition to the one that caused their heart attack. Previously, doctors focused on opening the one artery responsible for the heart attack, leaving the other blockages for treatment with medication alone.
  • Community of Distinction to welcome trio of leaders

    October 30, 2019
    • News Article
    Three professors of the Faculty of Health Sciences who brought distinction and recognition to McMaster University and the Faculty through their innovative teaching, outstanding scholarship and innovative research, will join its Community of Distinction in a ceremony on Friday, Nov. 8 at 4 p.m.
  • The essence of internal medicine is now in your hand

    October 24, 2019 by Tina Depko, Health Sciences
    • News Article
    The first edition of the McMaster Textbook of Internal Medicine is making its formal debut, fittingly, in time for the 50th anniversary celebrations of the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine this month.
  • Take a deep breath: $2 Million Gift for Firestone from the Boris Family

    October 23, 2019
    • News Article
    The Boris Family has made a $2 million investment to the Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health.
  • More electronic device use tied to more sugar and caffeine in teens

    October 22, 2019
    • News Article
    Do young teens who spend more time with TV and electronic devices drink more sugared or caffeinated drinks than others? Yes, they do, says a study of U.S. teens led by McMaster University researchers. It is a concern because many exceed recommended levels of both sugar and caffeine, says pediatrician Katherine Morrison, who led the research together with colleagues at McMaster and California State University - Fullerton.
  • #MacMed50: MD alumnus establishes bursary for 50th anniversary

    October 22, 2019 by Tina Depko, Health Sciences
    • News Article
    Mark Magenheim says it was an easy decision on how to best commemorate the 50th anniversary of McMaster University’s medical school. As a long-time donor, an MD ’74 alumnus and a former faculty member, a financial gift to mark this momentous occasion only seemed apt.
  • #MacMed50: Meet the Class of 2021

    October 21, 2019 by Tina Depko
    • News Article
    The 50th class of undergraduate medical students of McMaster University’s Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine is the Class of 2021. Three medical students of the class of 206 share their stories, motivations and their hopes.
  • #MacMed50: Five decades of research excellence

    October 15, 2019 by Tina Depko, Health Sciences
    • News Article
    McMaster University has been recognized as Canada’s most research-intensive university for the past two consecutive years. That recognition, in part, can be attributed to the quality, quantity and impact of the research that’s coming from its Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine.
  • #MacMed50: 50 years of educational excellence

    October 10, 2019 by Tina Depko, Health Sciences
    • News Article
    Problem-based learning. Creativity in developing better ways to select medical school candidates. National and international awards for teaching and education research. Innovation in starting Canada’s first midwifery and civilian physician assistant programs. These are just a few of the many ways the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine has earned a reputation in Canada and around the world as a risk-taker, innovator and leader in medical education.
  • #MacMed50: Fostering the 'ties' in our communities

    October 8, 2019
    • News Article
    McMaster University's medical school campuses in Hamilton, Niagara and Waterloo are woven into the fabric of their communities. From undergraduate medical students in family medicine clinics to residents in McMaster Children's Hospital, they impact the quality and availability of care in the health-care systems where they learn and work.
  • #MacMed50: McMaster celebrating golden anniversary of medical school

    October 2, 2019
    • News Article
    From symposiums on the continuing development of problem-based learning and the latest in health research to campus tours and a gala party, the program is set to celebrate the 50th anniversary of McMaster University's Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine. The three days of activities will highlight the five decades since the first medical school class began in the fall of 1969.
  • No need to cut down red and processed meat consumption

    October 1, 2019
    • News Article
    Most people can continue to eat red and processed meat as they do now. A major study led by researchers at McMaster and Dalhousie universities has found cutting back has little impact on health.
  • McMaster joins in development of Hamilton Health Team

    November 28, 2019
    • News Article
    The Department of Family Medicine of McMaster University is helping provide leadership of the Hamilton Ontario Health Team announced by Deputy Premier and Minister of Health Christine Elliott this week. The department is an executive sponsor and provides one of the five executive leads for the new organization which will implement a new model of organizing and delivering health care for the region.
  • Better way to interpret blood tests reduces need for CT scans to diagnose pulmonary embolism

    November 28, 2019
    • News Article
    A study led by Hamilton researchers has found a new way to interpret blood test results in patients who are investigated for blood clots in their lungs, a condition known as pulmonary embolism. This new approach applies to D-dimer blood tests, which are used by physicians to rule out the presence of a blood clot. Researchers found that a higher than usual D-dimer level can be considered a negative result if the physician has assessed the patient as having a low probability of having a pulmonary embolism.
  • McMaster medical student will be Rhodes Scholar

    November 28, 2019
    • News Article
    Nina Acharya, a first year medical student at McMaster, has been awarded a distinguished Rhodes scholarship. The Ottawa native hopes to complete a master's of philosophy in international development with an emphasis on children's nutrition while a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford in the U.K.
  • Optimizing radiation therapies for breast cancer patients

    November 25, 2019
    • News Article
    Timothy Whelan, a McMaster University clinical researcher who has made advances in breast cancer therapies, is being honoured by the Canadian Cancer Society. Whelan is the 2019 recipient of the O. Harold Warwick Prize for outstanding achievements in cancer control research.
  • Potent antimicrobial found that shows promise in fighting staph infections

    November 25, 2019
    • News Article
    Research led by scientists from McMaster University has yielded a potent antimicrobial that works against the toughest infectious disease strains. The find could be the beginning of developing new therapeutics to combat drug-resistant infections. The discovery is important as it is directly related to the development of Staphylococcus aureus diseases, known popularly as staph infections, which are the leading cause of the growing global danger of antimicrobial resistance, particularly the Methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strains which are becoming resistant to all current antibiotics.
  • Virtual and mixed reality inferior to traditional learning in anatomy education: McMaster

    November 20, 2019
    • News Article
    A study from McMaster University has shown that traditional ways of learning anatomy remain superior to those that rely on digital media. The research suggests that virtual reality (VR) and mixed reality (MR) are inferior to traditional physical models of learning, and have major disadvantages in cost and functionality.
  • Cannabis found not to be a substitute for opioids: McMaster research

    November 19, 2019
    • News Article
    There has been interest in cannabis being used as a replacement drug for people with opioid use disorder, but research at McMaster University has found it doesn't work.
  • Project to answer last wishes spreads successfully

    November 15, 2019
    • News Article
    New McMaster research has found a program that honours dying patients by fulfilling end of life wishes can be powerful, affordable and sustainable in many settings.
  • Antibiotic-resistant infections could destroy our way of life: New report

    November 12, 2019
    • News Article
    Humanity’s defences against infection are wearing thinner by the day, and the microbes responsible are getting stronger. One in four infections is already resistant to antibiotics and other known forms of treatment, and 5,400 Canadians died last year from infections that until recently had been treatable. That’s according to a comprehensive peer-reviewed report presented by the Council of Canadian Academies this week.

    EXTERNAL LINK

  • Supersize your financial output with Finance 2 Go

    November 6, 2019
    • News Article
    Individuals entering financial information in Mosaic with a high transaction volume had a low error rate and those with a low volume had both a higher error rate and a longer than average entry time. Which made sense to them – if people don’t do this kind of work very often, how could they know all the ins-and-outs in Mosaic?

    EXTERNAL LINK

  • New collaborative workspaces coming to Health Sciences Library

    November 6, 2019
    • News Article
    Construction is underway at the Health Sciences Library in the Health Sciences Centre to make room for the Michael G. DeGroote Initiative for Innovation in Healthcare (MGDII). The new area on the library's first floor will incorporate collaborative workspaces to be used in building a culture of health entrepreneurship at McMaster.
  • Researchers discover new toxin that impedes bacterial growth

    November 6, 2019
    • News Article
    An international research collaboration has discovered a new bacteria-killing toxin that shows promise of impacting superbug infectious diseases. The discovery of this growth-inhibiting toxin, which bacteria inject into rival bacteria to gain a competitive advantage, was published today in the journal Nature.
  • Trust and social support important to heart health among Canadian First Nations: Study

    December 20, 2019
    • News Article
    A major study has found that Canadian First Nations communities with greater socio-economic advantages, educational opportunities, social support of family members and greater trust between community members, have lower cardiac risk factors. On the other hand, First Nations communities with difficulty accessing routine health care or affordable prescription medicines have a greater burden of cardiac risk factors.
  • Holiday closures at the Faculty of Health Sciences

    December 20, 2019
    • News Article
    There will be several holiday closures that impact Faculty of Health Sciences staff, students, faculty and visitors. These closures begin Wednesday January 25th. The University re-opens on Thursday, January 2nd 2020.
  • College of Health Inventors created at McMaster

    December 16, 2019
    • News Article
    A networking think tank focused on fostering success in entrepreneurship and innovation has been formed at McMaster University. The College of Health Inventors comes out of the Michael G. DeGroote Initiative for Innovation in Healthcare (MGDII).
  • Warm greetings follow announcement of new McMaster president

    December 12, 2019
    • News Article
    David Farrar is being welcomed as McMaster University's next president. "At the Faculty of Health Sciences we have been very impressed with Dr. Farrar since we began working with him after he arrived as provost and vice-president, academic, and even more recently in his role as the acting president," said Paul O'Byrne, dean and vice-president of the Faculty of Health Sciences.
  • Secret behind diabetes drug’s benefits revealed

    December 9, 2019
    • News Article
    Researchers at McMaster University have unlocked one of the secrets behind the many benefits of metformin. One of the most widely used medications in the world; metformin is commonly prescribed for Type 2 diabetes. However, in addition to its effects on lowering blood sugar, in preclinical models, metformin shows benefits on aging and a number of diverse diseases such as cognitive disorders, cancer and cardiovascular disease.
  • Long-term study finds faster breast cancer radiation treatment as effective as longer course

    December 6, 2019
    • News Article
    A shorter course of higher-dose radiation treatment to part of the breast is showing promise in women with early-stage breast cancer who undergo breast conserving surgery, says a study led by Hamilton researchers. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) sees larger doses of radiation delivered to parts of the breast affected by cancer. This treatment takes place in one week or less, further reducing length of treatment from the standard treatment of three to five weeks.
  • Will it ever get easier?

    December 5, 2019
    • News Article
    Another visit home has come to an end, and I say goodbye to my family. I look out the airplane window and see Mexico City's lights slowly getting smaller as we ascend, eventually fading to complete darkness.
  • Diana Sherifali appointed inaugural Heather M. Arthur chair

    December 3, 2019
    • Appointments / Promotions
    Diana Sherifali, a clinician scientist of the School of Nursing, has been named the inaugural Heather M. Arthur Population Health Research Institute/Hamilton Health Sciences Chair in Inter-Professional Health Research at McMaster University. The appointment was effective July 1, 2019 and has received approval by the University's Senate.