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Addiction | Alcohol | Drugs

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Adolescents

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Athletics | Exercise

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Pregnancy

The process by which a female produces an offspring in their womb once the male and female zygotes have combined into a single embryo until birth.

Embryo

The offspring in the womb, from the moment 2 zygotes co-exist up until the 11th week of pregnancy, is medically referred to as "Embryo"

Fetus

The offspring in the womb, beginning on the 11th week of pregnancy, has graduated from "Embryo" to "Fetus"

Newborn

The offspring, now emerged from the womb and ending the female's pregnancy.

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Cancer

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Children

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









COVID-19

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Disease

An abnormality caused due to pathophysiological response to external or internal factors.

Disorder

A disruption in normal functioning of mind or body due to a disease, genetic factor or trauma.

Syndrome

A set or collection of various identifying signs and symptoms that characterizes a certain disease or disorder.

Condition

An abnormal state of physical or mental health that interferes with usual activities or the feeling of well-being.

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Food | Obesity

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Girls ♀ Women

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Infections | Immune System

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Injury | Pain | Violence

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Medication | Treatment | Therapy | Surgery

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Mental Health | Wellbeing | Stress | Sleep

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Myths | Fake News | Science Mistrust

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Physical Health | Human Body | Sex

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Products | Supplements

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

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Racism | Inequality

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Science

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









Technology

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]









YouTube #Shorts

COVID-19s Baby Bust – Pregnancy and Mental Health

Apr 14, 2021, 16:00 PM by Sébastien Violette, Hana Nazal, and Stephanie Wang
Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, everyone jokingly made statements about how the world would experience a “COVID-related baby boom.” However, this couldn’t be further from the truth and new findings in research are suggesting an opposite effect. With the population facing the impact of on and off lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, women, especially new and expecting mothers, are at a higher risk of experiencing decreasing mental health. Research suggests that, when compared to men, the increased isolation and burdens caused by the pandemic, paired with the burdens that are brought on traditionally by pregnancy are causing first-time and expecting mothers to feel higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Maternal mental health not only affects their overall health and functioning in both the short- and long-term, but it also affects the physical, cognitive, and psychological development of their child. These conditions, only worsened by the pandemic, are inflating the risks of maternal mental health morbidity. Furthermore, with healthcare restrictions in effect to mitigate the spread of the disease, findings suggest that there is a decrease in the quality of intrapartum care which has only caused increases in institutional stillbirth rates and neonatal mortality. This doesn’t need to be the case.

Additional support resources:

The MotHERS Program
613-549-6666 ext. 3937
https://www.themothersprogram.ca/

Birthright Toronto:
1-800-550-4900 (hotline)
www.birthright.org BORN

Ontario:
613-737-7600 ext. 6022
https://www.bornontario.ca/en/index.aspx

Aid to Women:
416-921-6016 (phone)
www.aidtowomen.ca
 

[Please complete our feedback form]












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