Demystifying Medicine Video



Follow a student's unfortunate experience when she accidentally ingests food that she is allergic to. As we go through this fictional scenario, we'll learn about what anaphylactic shock is, the general signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis, and what happens at a molecular level when an individual goes through an anaphylactic episode. We will also be introduced to the proper usage of an EpiPen and how it works. Please note: This video is meant to provide a basic overview of anaphylaxis and epinephrine autoinjectors. Visit your local healthcare provider to learn more about these topics.

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References
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  • HOW To Use The EpiPen Auto-Injector. EpiPen.ca. (2018). Retrieved 10 November 2019.
  • Jiménez-Saiz R, Chu DK, Mandur TS, Walker TD, Gordon ME, Chaudhary R, et al. Lifelong memory responses perpetuate humoral T H 2 immunity and anaphylaxis in food allergy. J Allergy Clin Immunol [Internet]. 2017 Dec [cited 2019 Jul 4];140(6):1604-1615.e5.
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  • Sicherer, S., & Simons, F. (2017). Epinephrine for First-aid Management of Anaphylaxis. Pediatrics, 139(3). doi: 10.1542/peds.2016-4006