Demystifying Medicine Video



This video investigates the claim that eating yogurt boosts gut microbiota and repairs damaged microbiota. It explains what a microbiota is, the relationship between host and microbiota and the role of yogurt in the health of microbiota. Information is provided about how the consumption of yogurt can affect the composition, structure and function of the gastrointestinal tract. The video concludes that yogurt itself does not contain the wide range of microorganisms that are required to repair a damaged microbiota and that those microorganisms in yougurt are often unable to colonize the human intestine. Therefore, the effects of yogurt consumption are often temporary. On the other hand, yogurt can be useful in speeding up the recovery of acute gastrointestinal problems.

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References
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