Welcome

 

James Paul portrait

Welcome to the Department of Anesthesia within the Faculty of Health Sciences at McMaster University. The department has experienced steady growth over the last 10 years and is currently comprised of 34 full-time faculty and 165 part-time faculty.

Our major strength is people and several members of the department are in significant leadership roles within the hospitals and academic programs. Our hospital partners include Hamilton Health Sciences and St. Joseph's Healthcare locally, but we also reach out into the community through the Waterloo Regional Campus and the Niagara Regional Campus.

- Dr. James Paul, Professor & Chair



News

Events

MERIT Rounds - How Poor Assessment Practices Make us Unsafe (Dr. Eric Warm)

This presentation introduces a closely related concept: educational safety. It will review the elements of programmatic assessment through a safety lens, and challenge those who create such systems to consider a host of ideas that will be discussed.

This event will be online only: https://bit.ly/MERITJanRounds2022

Tell me I'm Great: How Poor Assessment Practices Make us Unsafe


Psychological safety is the shared belief held by members of a team that the team is safe for interpersonal risk taking. This presentation introduces a closely related concept: educational safety. Educational safety considers the essence of what constitutes psychological safety for learners. Just as psychological safety can improve care outcomes, educational safety should be able to improve educational outcomes. Students experience educational safety when they feel that they don't have to constantly self-monitor, and yet the medical education system often creates conditions where this kind of safety is impossible. Medical education can and should create systems of assessment and feedback that promote growth mindset and master adaptive learning. The presenter will review the elements of programmatic assessment through a safety lens, and challenge those who create such systems to consider three ideas: 1) Assessment should minimize risk, not lead to it; 2) Most assessment and feedback should be for learning, and not of learning, and 3) Good enough should be excellent and make "best" irrelevant.

Speaker:

Eric Warm M.D. is professor of medicine, vice chair for graduate medical education, and internal medicine residency program director at the University of Cincinnati. His team researches novel mechanisms to assess educational and clinical performance within the context of residency training to improve learning and care. He has a particular interest in the emerging field of ‘Learning Analytics’, techniques that interpret educational data to describe, characterize, and predict the learning behaviors of individuals in higher education. Dr. Warm has received multiple teaching awards including the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada International Residency Educator of the Year Award.

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